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Author Topic: Growing vegies in a unit  (Read 8113 times)

trobinta

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Growing vegies in a unit
« on: February 20, 2007, 05:35:44 AM »
have a friend now living in a unit and is thinking of growing hydroponic vegies. Is there an organic hyndroponic method or is there only formulas A & B.

Is there recommended reading

David Corkill

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Re: Growing vegies in a unit
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2007, 04:10:21 PM »
I have heard of organic hydroponic lettuces, although they are reportedly not as tasty. It does sound like a bit of a contradiction to me. Organic growing is about food with its roots in healthy soil, rather than dissolved nutrients fed through a sterile medium.

It should be possible to use an organic nutrient source in a hydroponic set up. Perhaps a weak 'tea' made from worm castings with a little liquid seaweed extract on the side would be suitable.

Some of my friends who live in places with no real soil available have great gardens in containers.

jeza

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Re: Growing vegies in a unit
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2009, 09:38:05 PM »
I bought a quantity of matching plastic buckets, with handles.  I fill them with organic soil and grow some veggies and herbs successfully.  Just punch holes in the bottom of the bucket for drainage.  I don't live in a unit, I have a large garden but it is handy to just carry the bucket by the handle and take it to the kitchen.  These buckets cost $1 at hardware stores.  I have been doing this for a couple of years and it works really well.  I grow a couple of varieties of mint, parsley, garlic chives, cutting celery etc and the plants are very healthy. 

Gardening

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Re: Growing vegies in a unit
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2009, 11:28:47 PM »
It is highly possible to grow vegetables as a unit of several different species.
For this you need more space and healthy soil to get all types of vegetables.
Some good sunlight and organic manure.
For more read - http://www.gardeningplanning.com/vegetable-garden.php

Mariya_maria

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Re: Growing vegies in a unit
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2009, 05:22:45 PM »
There are a number of formal organic gardening and farming systems that prescribe specific techniques. They tend to be more specific than, and fit within, general organic standards.A garden is more than just a means of providing food, it is a model of what is possible in a community - everyone could have a garden of some kind (container, growing box, raised bed) and produce healthy, nutritious organic food, a farmers market, a place to pass on gardening experience, and a sharing of bounty, promoting a more sustainable way of living that would encourage their local economy.

MatthewWilliam

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Re: Growing vegies in a unit
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2010, 08:33:15 PM »
Advantages of potted fruit & vegetable gardens are that they can take up as much or as little space as you require. They can be moved to different locations depending on the season.

MelissaF

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Re: Growing vegies in a unit
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2010, 07:37:52 PM »
I have read about hydroponic veggies in an article on the internet which shows me that Growing hydroponic vegetables carries the following advantages over traditional soil based gardening.

1. The big problem of knowing exactly how much to water your vegetables is eliminated! Your Hydroponic Vegetables will never have too much water which will cause the roots to rot or have too little causing them to die of thirst! This is the main problem with traditional gardening!

2. Your plants will grow much faster as the roots do not need to spread out and look for nutrients in the soil. Instead it is applied directly to the roots! Research has suggested that growing lengths have been cut by as much as 50%!

3. No soil is required! This is ideal if you live in the city and have no garden or you live somewhere where the soil is of terrible quality. You don’t have to pay to have soil brought in! If you live in the desert or Antarctica…problem solved!

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4. Due to no soil being needed there are no soil borne diseases being passed on to the plants! Your hydroponic vegetables will be far healthier as a consequence!

5. As you’re not using soil, the use of pesticides is greatly reduced if not eliminated!

6. The cost of growing hydroponic vegetables is estimated to be 20% less than traditional growing methods! Once it’s set up, the cost is miniscule!

7. Hydroponic Vegetables take up less space as the root size is reduced. This is because the roots don’t need to spread out in order to find water and nutrients.

8. Maintenance is practically non existent! Once set up there is nothing for you to do other than to pick the vegetables once they are ready! Weeding doesn’t exist when growing hydroponically and there’s no need to water them as it’s readily available.

9. Your yield is year round so you’ll never run out of fresh vegetables for your family.

10. You can grow your plants anywhere; in the garden, greenhouse, conservatory or bedroom.

Why don’t you consider growing Hydroponic Tomatoes!
Regards,
Ali.

David Corkill

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Re: Growing vegies in a unit
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2010, 08:22:50 PM »
Hydroponic growing can yield a harvest in a smaller area but it is not really an organic method. I don't like the idea of plants growing in a sterile medium and being 'fed' with water soluble nutrients.

Plants belong in the ground, or in containers filled with a growing medium which is as close as possible to good soil.

The healthiest plants and the most nutritious food is grown in natural organic soil.

rosalind

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Re: Growing vegies in a unit
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2012, 10:22:28 PM »
I have heard of organic hydroponic lettuces, although they are reportedly not as tasty. It does sound like a bit of a contradiction to me. Organic growing is about food with its roots in healthy soil, rather than dissolved nutrients fed through a sterile medium.

It should be possible to use an organic nutrient source in a hydroponic set up. Perhaps a weak 'tea' made from worm castings with a little liquid seaweed extract on the side would be suitable.

Some of my friends who live in places with no real soil available have great gardens in containers.

Well, organic hydroponic lettuces is good options. Using this method  you will have no requirement to avoid any soil loving pests so you don't required to infuse in any pesticides which are costly.

 

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