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Author Topic: Soil Fertility  (Read 5794 times)

David Corkill

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Soil Fertility
« on: November 25, 2006, 08:44:02 PM »
A simple summary of how to ensure garden soil is fertile:
  • Keep the organic material in soil topped up with compost and organic mulches
  • Look after soil structure - keep it open and "crumbly"
  • Add nutrients to the soil that it might be lacking, using natural materials
Healthy soil grows healthy food. :)

trobinta

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Re: Soil Fertility
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2006, 06:58:13 PM »
Its OK to say use natural materials for nutrients but where do you get molibdomum 
Robin

David Corkill

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Re: Soil Fertility
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2007, 12:06:34 PM »
Kelp extract is what I use to supply plants with trace elements such as molybdenum. Compost should contain some as well.

lynsay144

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Gardening Seeds
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2009, 10:28:05 AM »
<p>Thank you very much for the information I really appreciate it!!<br>
  I found this useful site for <a href="http://www.gardeningandplanting.com/" rel="nofollow">gardening seeds</a></p>

JAdams

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Re: Soil Fertility
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2009, 05:36:33 AM »
How do I check which ingredients are lacking from the soil?

David Corkill

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Re: Soil Fertility
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2009, 09:53:41 AM »
Test the soil.
Commercial soil testing services such as APAL http://www.apal.com.au/ give a full analysis of soil nutrients. A cheaper test can be done with a kit at home, but will only test for a few major nutrients.

Observe plants growing in the soil.
Deficiencies in soil nutrients show as discolouring or misshapen leaves, stems and tips of different plants. You might need to search and study to learn more about this. This web page shows the symptoms of nutrtient deficiencies in tomatoes: http://4e.plantphys.net/article.php?ch=t&id=289

MatthewWilliam

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Re: Soil Fertility
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2010, 05:52:53 PM »
Desert soils can be amended by adding organic or synthetic fertilizers, organic material, compost, and topsoil to the mixture. Water-soluble fertilizers tend to pollute over time by adding unwanted salts to the soil and through runoff. Slow release fertilizers or organic fertilizers are much less harmful to the soil and to the environment.

Mog

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Re: Soil Fertility
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2010, 03:40:35 PM »
Add lots of compost, and any trace elements that you are missing.

DPeterson99

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Re: Soil Fertility
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2011, 01:01:15 PM »
I think it's all about nutrients for the plants to grasp within the soil. One must really also need to enhance the capabilities of the soil to nurture its nest of vitamins within the aspects of life.

« Last Edit: November 15, 2011, 03:00:26 PM by David Corkill »

JeffreySMOFT

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Soil Fert
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2017, 06:28:01 PM »
I do not see any problem in changing the medium of growing from soil to hydro and vice- verse. There are going to be some sore of changing but the logic and the results are not going o be much more different.
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