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Author Topic: What are good organic fertilisers?  (Read 8638 times)

rachaelsoore298

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What are good organic fertilisers?
« on: June 27, 2008, 11:35:37 AM »
Just wondering if you guys have used any great organic fertilisers you want to tell me about!

Sean

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2008, 09:49:16 PM »
Charlie Carp have an organic spray fertiliser that is made from european carp, I rate this 100%!

Jonhethon

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2008, 03:35:32 AM »
Hi Rachael,

Here are organic fertilizers :

1)   Organic manure
2)   Tobacco dust
3)   Compost manure
4)   Humic
5)   Amino(soya proteins)
6)   Fulvic
7)   Brassinolides
8)   Seaweed extract




« Last Edit: August 31, 2008, 10:31:16 AM by David Corkill »

rosalind

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2012, 09:58:39 PM »
Just wondering if you guys have used any great organic fertilisers you want to tell me about!

Well, You can use Kelp Meal Fertilizer.. This is resulting from darkish seaweeds from the beach. Dry kelps is effective in keeping flower as well as assist in the continual and slow launch of nutritional value for the vegetation.






CarloMartin947

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2012, 04:22:26 AM »
I always use the principle that Alan Chadwick advocated: Use fertilizers that recreate the conditions in which the wild species likes to grow in. For example, wild asparagus grows near the sea, so seaweed is great for that plant. But in general, well rotted cow manure coupled with a light smattering of bone meal is an excellent fertilizer mix. For more information on the Alan Chadwick method, see:
http://alan-chadwick.org/html%20pages/techniques/garden_plants/veg_photos.html . Hope this helps. Carl

JustLoveGardening

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2012, 11:16:43 AM »
I've always only used my decompossed  compost back into my garden.

JustLoveGardening

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2012, 11:19:33 AM »
By Jonathan White, environmental scientist

For many people, composting is just an alternative way of dealing with rubbish.  It prevents the garbage bin from getting full and smelly.  It’s also a way of disposing of grass clippings and leaves, which saves many trips to the garbage depot.  Whilst these things are valid, they are not giving compost the full credibility it deserves.  Compost can be very valuable when used in the right way.

I have a completely different way of looking at compost.  To me, composting is a way of building valuable nutrients that will, one day, feed me and my family.  I only use compost on my vegetable gardens.  The way I manage my vegetable gardens means that composting is an integral part of the whole food production system.  I create compost as a way of collecting nutrients in one form (waste), and turning them into another form (food).

The average person buys food from a shop, consumes it and then sends the waste away.  This is simply buying nutrients, taking what you need for that precise moment, and disregarding the remainder.  It’s a nutrient flow that only flows in one direction, like a fancy car roaring down the road.  You admire the car for a moment, but after a second or two, it’s gone.

My goal is to slow down the car and then get it to do a U-turn.  I want to keep the nutrients within my property where I can capitalize on them.  By doing this, I am able to use the nutrients again, so I don’t have to buy them for a second time.  Surely, that’s going to save me money.  It may seem strange to think of nutrients in this way when we can’t even physically see them.  However, all organic materials contain nutrients.  My goal is to get those nutrients out of the form they are in and into a form that is useful to me and my family.

To put it in a different way; composting is a vehicle in which we are able to create a nutrient cycle within our property.  We are part of that cycle because we consume the nutrients when they are, for a brief time, in a useful form.  Then they return to the compost and slowly make their way into another useful form where we consume them again.  This cycle can go on and on indefinitely.  Of course, there will be many lost nutrients that you will never see again, but with a little diligence, you will be surprised at how much compost you can create, and hence, how many valuable nutrients you can recycle.

My composting system is large because I have a few large vegetable gardens.  I believe that the size of your vegetable garden should be determined by how much compost you can create, and not merely by the amount of space you have in your backyard.  To run a rich, high yielding vegetable garden you need to have some sort of soil conditioning plan, and the best thing for your soil is a generous layer of good compost on the surface a few times per year.

If you can create your own compost from the organic waste that you generate in your everyday life, then you can have a vegetable garden that is self-sustainable.  Once it is set up, it will never need nutrients in the form of store-bought fertilizers.  You will have established a flow of nutrients, and your nutrient-store will grow bigger and bigger, year after year.  Applying compost to your garden will have a very positive effect on your soil structure and fertility.  With good soil structure and plenty of organic material, you will be able to release nutrients that have been locked up and unavailable to your plants.  You will be speeding up the flow of nutrients, thus increasing your yield significantly.  Your soil will become alive and healthy with micro-organisms and soil bacteria that are beneficial to creating the conditions for proper plant growth.  Your vegetables will contain all the essential nutrients in the correct proportions, giving your body the vitamins and minerals it needs to function at its best.

Composting is very easy once you make it part of your everyday life.  A small container on your kitchen bench to collect scraps and a daily trip to the compost bin is all it takes.  It’s a small effort for huge rewards.  The golden rule in making compost is never to have large clumps of a single type of material.  Thin layers of hot and cold materials work best.  Cold materials include leaves, shredded newspaper and dried grass clippings.  Hot materials include fresh grass clippings, manures, weeds, discarded soft plants and kitchen scraps.

If you make composting part of you daily routine, along with an effective method of growing food, you can literally save thousands of dollars per year.  This is possible simply because you won’t have to keep buying nutrients over and over.  You will buy them once, hold onto them and then convert them into useful forms again and again.  It’s that simple!

Tony Rehor

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2013, 08:58:51 AM »
I use dead fish material and also homemade compost for all my plants with great results.

goodkarma

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2013, 11:50:36 PM »
Free (or at least very cheap if you have to buy the ingredients) is homemade seaweed tea. The steps are:

1) Gather or buy your seaweed, rinse well and place into a lidded bucket.

2) Add water to cover it - leaving room at the top for stirring room.

3) Stir it every couple of days and otherwise leave it for anywhere from a few weeks to a few months. It will probably stink - which is why you need a lidded bucket :-) and store it well away from your house!

4) It is ready for use when you can't smell any ammonia

5) Dilute it at a ratio of five parts water to one part seaweed tea. Or even more if it looks dark.

Shelley
http://www.GoSelfSufficient.org

eagle4031

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2013, 08:32:30 PM »
I am just developing my garden and hopefully I can use only home compost

modernhealthylifestyle

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2013, 08:01:20 AM »
On our farm we store fish heads and left over raw fish body parts in a tank and leave for 2 years.  Excellent for your pasture growth, color and your organic garden.  Smelly for a while but so good for growth.
Gather seaweed and place into a bin covered with water, top up occasionally and leave for at least a year; this is an excellent fertilizer.  When the water content is used break up the seaweed and put into your compost bin or just lay on or dig into the garden.
Our vegetable and table waste goes into a large compost bin which has three layers and we take from the bottom where it has broken down completely.
Our soil is volcanic so free draining. 
Cow manure, goat manure we do not use sheep or horse manure.   :)

R19cali

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What are good organic fertili
« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2014, 02:53:43 AM »
Ive thought about a slowly dissolving organic puck, maybe to lessen the mix over the week, until the change.jobes comes to mind, but somehow I think it will stink, just like it already does in the bag
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Lynda Dillman

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Re: What are good organic fertilisers?
« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2014, 05:34:23 AM »
The best compost does wonders to my garden is worm compost, not only is it a cost free way to enrich my soil but it gives my plant some good nutrients.

I also use soya proteins and Ttbacco dust just to name a few.
Lynda Dillman is the author of HowToMakeAWormFarm.com which guides you on how to start worming and produce your own compost.

Get my FREE ebook the Worm Farming Manual Here.

R19cali

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« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2019, 11:03:32 AM »





 
 
 
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