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Sonia

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Sand
« on: August 17, 2010, 09:04:36 AM »
Living at Semaphore ,my soil has very little soil in it.  It is -  sand.
Having never planted here before, what is a cheap way of improving it, for veg?
I am thinking horse poo, blood and bone, mulch?
If I start now I may be able to plant in a month or so?



David Corkill

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Re: Sand
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2010, 08:26:04 PM »
When I lived out that way I used a deep layer of mulch in the garden. Mostly straw  and lawn clippings with some seagrass and a little manure. The sand does dry quickly and mulch can help retain moisture.

You should be able to plant in a month's time, provided you don't use too much blood and bone (no more than half a cup per square metre).

Some good compost mixed into the sand will also help.

Maralyn45

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Re: Sand
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2010, 02:06:47 PM »
Add some good compost and mulch into your soil for good crop and your soil.

MatthewWilliam

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Re: Sand
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2010, 05:49:33 PM »
Sand is transported by wind and water and deposited in the form of beaches, dunes, sand spits, sand bars and related features. In environments such as gravel-bed rivers and glacial moraines it often occurs as one of the many grain sizes that are represented.

Mog

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Re: Sand
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2010, 03:39:02 PM »
Cover it with a layer of straw, then blood and bone, then another layer of straw, then a layer of manure. Keep it well watered for 6 months, then dig it in and you should be good to go.

Peter171

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Re: Sand
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2012, 03:03:40 AM »
Hi

I live in Guernsey and certain parts of the island have a very Sandy soil. Have you ever tasted fresh sand carrots, really sweet and full of flavour. My garden wasn't blessed with a great deal of sand so I converted part of one of my raised bets so I could grow them - great result. On your horse poo, make sure it is straw based and not sawdust or wood chipping based

Good luck
Peter ;)
Peter Womersley has 30+ years of organic gardening experience that he wants to share. Get his free video and fact sheets and access to his blog. Sign up at http://theorganicgardenexposed.com/becomeanexpert/

TheRipeTomato

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Re: Sand
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2012, 06:03:02 PM »
Basically add ANYTHING organic.  Veggie scraps, hay, manure, peat, lawn clippings, leaves.....anything.

rosalind

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Re: Sand
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2012, 04:52:24 PM »
When I lived out that way I used a deep layer of mulch in the garden. Mostly straw  and lawn clippings with some seagrass and a little manure. The sand does dry quickly and mulch can help retain moisture.

You should be able to plant in a month's time, provided you don't use too much blood and bone (no more than half a cup per square metre).

Some good compost mixed into the sand will also help.

Well, I even also use deep layer of mulch. Mulch gather opposite to  the plant conduct  to boost  moisture, which can lead rot and proliferation of fungal diseases. But bear in mind that not pile the mulch mound over natural roots, So that they can dry nicely.



 

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